Film study: Huskies look sharp against Michigan State


Kalen Deboer and company had a great game plan, and the execution by the players shows that they get it done practically every day. The use of extra barriers in passing passes was really impressive. Michael Bennix is ​​the real deal. This really feels like a well-trained soccer team, with opponent fans saying (unfortunately) “We’ve outdone coaching.”

Let’s choose: We’d like to see a better 8-minute attack. Chris Petersen has been a master at shortening the game using the entire gameplay clock and making sure all plays have a high rate of continuous clock movement. DeBoer’s “semi-hurried but standing there for 20 seconds” style seems to have knocked the beat out of the tempo, so why not just do a dummy rally and break for LOS with 20 seconds on the clock, and take it at number 5. Also the 4 minuses on three drives cost them 40sec . From the 10 minute mark for the fourth quarter, we’d estimate DeBoer gave MSU roughly 4 minutes that Petersen evaporated.

Shortcomings are likely to be less playable and more of a poor choice by the Penix, but there are safer throws to make. Penix may also need a lesson on how to recognize when the speed option is not working. It is also possible that the QB offside was checked on day 4 and the target.

However, Penix coverage IDs, timing/movement/mechanics, etc. are elite at the moment.

to the movie:

Fourth and goal

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First off this week, we have one of Husky’s failed games on the line. Being as explosive as we were in attack throughout the match, we weren’t able to get in contact and do all the plays we hope to play in short-term situations.

Faced with a fourth goal and a goal from the 1.5-yard line, we line up in a strong Force 1 formation as if we were going to line up and try to outflank the defense at LOS. Instead of playing live, we requested a low velocity option appearance that we showed up last week against Portland State. Given our breakdown last week, the velocity option concept is a good game to play in some short-term situations because it uses the threat of a QB option to gain the numbers advantage at the point of attack, specifically in a side action away from where the defense might be. Be focused.

There are two main areas where this play was staged sideways. First, there are two ways you can block the speed option. You can get the block OL down (washing the defense away from the attack point), or you can make them reach the barricade (moving towards the attack point to shut down the defenders. In this play we try to reach the block down DL to set up #10 as the reading man on the speed option. As far as Troy Fautanu has been in traffic protection all night, he totally sniffs his block of access on the DE. For whatever reason, he seems to have expected that DE would have hit him in the head instead of crashing in. The danger with the speed option turned on from the bottom center is that it makes QB more vulnerable to any penetration He crossed the line than if he was running it from a rifle or pistol where he’s a few yards off the pillow. With the DE collapsing inside and penetrating through the OL, he absolutely blew this play.

Second, even with the advantage of having the concept of an ‘extra blocker’ option, Michigan State He has more defenders in the attack point before the snap. No matter how the ban happened, the Spartans had enough defenders on the edge to account for both Penix and Davis.

The offense should have never played this play, and with 15 seconds left on the playing clock, they had more than enough time to make a check. This kind of target line/red zone game layout will need focus to move forward.

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first and 10

While the attack was not carried out on the goal line, we were sure we were lucky because the defense could. Immediately after turning the ball down, the defense was able to secure a formidable safety in shifting the momentum. This early in the game play was huge in setting the tone and proclaiming to everyone watching that this wasn’t the same UW defense that was pushed last year.

Backed up on a 2-yard line, Michigan State lines up in a tight group under the center formation with heavy personnel. All signs are that MSU will be running the ball, so we’re matching up with our 3-4 heavyweight group. Schematically, we are showing a 2-height slasher with Kamren Fabiculanan playing from a shallow depth toward the field. One would think that playing the 2-height projectile takes the bodies away from the running fit, but it’s all about how the coverage is configured to support the run, and it’s not always obvious beforehand. KamFab plays with shallow depth because he actually plays undercover on the fielding side of the offensive formation, and this allows Julius Irvin to play as the powerhouse defender from his shallow depth. This has a ripple effect by allowing the rest of the defensive front to crash hard inside and make a play in a few 1v1 positions.

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The 1v1 switch turned out to be Tuli Letuligasenoa. Tully – in his more aggressive role in the new defensive scheme – is able to put the right goalkeeper on the skis and blast the play without touching the right-back RB. Tolly pushes his leg back three yards, and to the right at the right-back RB trying to cut him off; Cut had to cut two yards deep into his end zone due to the thrust generated by Tully, Tris, and Ailey. This is the most vivid example of how our new defense creates opportunities for the defensive front to play in a vein, and it’s a good reminder that our talent at LOS is much better than what their previous chart showed.

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first and 10

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Then we were finally able to dismantle some of the offensive fireworks that were the standout takeaway in this game and we are also able to dismantle one of the key matches that decided the game.

Playing from midfield in positions one and ten, Grob felt aggressive against a defense that had already given up 14 points early on, so he made a request The 989 concept that we actually broke last week in studying the movie. The 989 is a 3-verts concept with two Go tracks on the circumference and aperture that can be adjusted according to coverage. It’s a versatile concept often used to attack defenses that like to cover quarters and cover 3 (such as MSU). It’s hard to tell from the broadcast angle, but the MSU is in a shallow 2 high casing on shots, but rotates after snapping into a 1 high casing with the border safety (top of the screen) rotating down in the burglar cover against the post aperture/cross. Penix sees a safety spin off Polk and throws a nice pass all the way across the field to complete a big.

The key to this play was actually scroll protection. MSU’s rush of passes into this game came with some notoriety after setting their opponents on fire early in the season, and while the UW’s OL team performed well against Kent State and Portland State, the youth streak workers haven’t really been tested yet. How they perform against the defensive front, as well as how the staff will try to help them, will determine how a pass game will work against a porous secondary.

Prior to the shot, Devin Culp’s Penix movements were out of his hole alignment to add to protection, but given in the 989’s is a 3-way concept, this 7-man movement and protection is likely part of the play’s appeal. Knowing that MSU was heavy in calling defensive play, the extra protection made a lot of sense in the lead play. But what is interesting is how the employees installed the 7-person protection, and how our blocking utilities were integrated.

As you can see in the reboot, there are no checks or adjustments, and it ends up being protected from going through what looks like a big call at a large scale. This is a blocker protection that tries to keep the OL identical on the DL and allows the RB to sort to catch any additional sneak attacks. MSU likes a double-mutton blitz that brings both LBs across the A-gap in the cross paths aiming to rock one of them in the middle, so it’s important to have a quality pass guard on the backcourt. In the play, the right side of our OL is attached to a DT and one of the blitz LBs, so Wayne Taulapapa had to step in and put the other Blitzer in the middle. Ban was always an added dimension to Wayne’s game that separated him in the RB deep room, and this play was a great example of why. It’s also worth noting that the staff trusted Culp to protect a 1v1 pass against Jacoby Windmon (MSU’s star-passing haste). Culp wasn’t known for stopping by, but he has an excellent cast in this play, and it’s encouraging that he earned the trust of the cast.

As always, pass protection is key to any big pass game, and this is a great play to highlight that it’s not just the OL who needs to take credit for protecting good passes.

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fourth and fifth

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Here in the latest offensive play in the movie study this week, we wanted to take a look at another of the little things that contributed to the excellent attack performance. We’ve already talked about blocking skill functions, but there was also Penix implementation inside the offense to maintain a high level of proficiency.

Here in this play, we encounter the fourth and fifth situation in the Spartan region. Our running game wasn’t particularly explosive during this stage of the game, so the passing situation was clear. The MSU shows a 1″ shotgun with the appearance of a blitzkrieg. Penix, upon seeing the cover appearance, immediately identifies McMillan in a quick exit as his favorite match. He steps back, hits the back of his drop, and releases the pass to the field side numbers for what appears to be a routine first turn downward at face value. However, Penix’s mastery of his readings and timing within the play make this seem routine. If he wasn’t confident of his covering identity, he wouldn’t throw the ball a full three steps before MacMillan broke on his way. If his mechanics and foot movements were not contacted, his timing would again be out of the paths of his receivers which would not maximize their separation. However, since they were both called, Penix was only able to throw a pass that McMillan couldn’t get at the exact time he would have the maximum breakup. Without these highly efficient plays, we wouldn’t have opportunities to do explosive plays.

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first and 10

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In the final play of this week’s movie study, we have another play where the defense is burned by a portable QB device. However, this week’s play was a little different than it has been in the past few weeks due to the defense’s progress in maintaining containment. While it may not be obvious in the play due to the large yardage Thorne gained in the scramble, this does represent a step in the right direction for defense.

In this play, instead of letting Thorne out of the box, we redirected him inward. ZTF kept its outside influence on the rush and got the pressure on. In theory, forcing Thorne back into the pocket should allow others to help with purge duty, but the aggressive reactions from our ILBs in response to the play’s action put them in poor positions to do the job. In the past weeks, QBs have been pushed out of the pocket into the open spaces, which is why we had so many long passes against us against KSU.

While we would like to have QB on the ground, this is something that can be addressed in the blueprint. Putting a spy on QB while maintaining containment is something we can modify in the future in hopes of limiting QB running. In this case, not only did the UW “spy” on QB, but the Inner Backs (Moll #9 in particular) turned their heads completely away from QB. Mostly because they lost.

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Another test for these employees will be the handling of that success, the laser focus on the Stanford game. It’s Stanford. It’s David Shaw. His teams can always bring up a problem, out of the year or not.


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