Cave leaders O line to pressure against the lions, lose the center to injury


DETROIT – In the final seconds of the frustrating loss, Washington Leaders Center Chase Rollier attempted to sit down at the black training table and retreated. Rollier’s weight shifted to his right leg, which had stumbled on the field moments earlier, and collapsed in front of the team’s medical staff.

In one of Washington’s last plays of the game, Losing 36-27 to the Detroit LionsLinebacker Julian Okwara correctly beats Sam Cosme with an inside pass. When Cosmi rushed to stop him, the lower half of the 6-foot-6, 309-pound tackle tire basically rolled over the back of Rollier’s legs. Rollier struggled to stand up, clutching the back of his right knee in pain, and eventually came off the field limping.

For about two minutes, Rollier faced face down in front of the training table as the coaching staff swarmed to help. Eventually, he rode a carriage back to the locker room and left on crutches. It is unclear how much, if any, he will miss – coach Ron Rivera did not have an update after the match – but the prospect of losing A smart sports center is an integral part of team protection For any length of time a serious concern.

After a rough first half, the leaders gathered but failed in Detroit

Washington line led by Much appreciated coach John Matescu, has established itself as one of the top teams in the league over the past two years, but Sunday’s performance indicated potential concerns. The unit struggled against an aggressive Detroit defense, especially in the first half, when nothing worked on the offensive. Leaders allowed pressure on 21 of the 53 dips (39.6 percent), according to TruMedia, the second-highest in the second week through the late afternoon window on Sunday.

Rivera said the streak in the first half was “a bit late” to pick up some of the lions’ exciting moves, when the defensive line’s men rush into each other rather than straight ahead. In the second half, Rivera thought the group played better.

“The guys in the offensive line are already engaged and assembled,” he said. “To their credit also, [the Lions] We knew we had to throw the ball, and we were still able to move it the way we did. We were still able to protect the way they did, for the most part.”

One of the biggest reasons Washington allowed such pressure is that Black defensive coordinator Aaron Glenn sent so many. Detroit is closed 18 times and got 11 quarterback hits. In the first week, Washington countered blitzes with a combination of protection to set the line, offensive coordinator Scott Turner called the plays in time, and quarterback Carson Wentz made quick and short passes. But this week, leaders occasionally faltered on every aspect.

On Washington’s second drive, Turner called a shot down at the start, but the pressure reached Wentz. And when he threw it away, it was reported for intentional grounding. Washington’s defense kept the team inside – allowing only three points in two early leads into the red – but the streak could not be taken advantage of.

In the third round, Wentz fell into his own end zone for a pass, but the defensive end Charles Harris beat left Charles Leno Jr. for the strip sack, who came out of the back of the end zone for safety.

After the match, Leno blamed himself for the play and called it a “bad group”.

“I can’t do that. I’m better than that,” said Leno. “I look at that as contributing to a slow start to the attack. We had momentum at that point, and then…the defense came back on the field, they gave up on any score, and you’re putting yourself in a hole. We have to start faster, but I’m going to put that on myself because I’m better than that and I know that.”

On the leaders’ deep offensive line, everyone has a “starting mentality”

In the past, Wentz has damaged his streak by holding on to the ball for too long and trying to play on the field. It looked as if he did it again a few times – notably early in the second quarter, when he was fired by Aidan Hutchinson, the Lions’ rising rusher in second and 10th – but the data suggests that none of Wentz’s efforts to expand the plays have been terrible.

In the second half, when Washington backed down a lot, trying to make up a huge shortfall, the streak held up better. The new keepers – Andrew Norwell on the left and Trae Turner on the right – looked more consistent, although they did suffer at times from blitzkrieg. Things seemed to be getting better until Rollier was injured.

In the locker room afterwards, when Rollier passed on crutches, Leno said the streak had taken the performance personally and would not allow it to happen again next week.

“I only know for a fact that we will come out with a better sense of urgency,” he said.


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